Wood Bolete

Scientific Name: 

Buchwaldoboletus lignicola

Synonyms: 

 A rare Boletus that grows on Conifer substrates. This species exhibits a gelatinous cuticle and decurrent pores, both unusual features of the family it belongs to. With close examination of key features, this species is relatively hassle-free to identify.

Colours

Confusion Species: 

Height: 

Cap Diameter (mm): 

40-100mm

Cap or Bracket Thickness (mm): 

Stem Height (mm): 

30-80mm

Stem Diameter (mm): 

5-25mm

Distribution: 

 Rare and vulnerable on Red Data List.

Habitat: 

 Found on stumps or trunks of Conifers. Exceptionally found on sawdust, but association will always remain with Conifer wood.
Often growing on wood decayed by Phaeolus schweinitzii and possibly parasitic on its mycelium.
 

Micro Habitat: 

Cap: 

 Convex, inrolled margin. Floccose to begin, then smooth with age. Slightly lubricous when moist, dull when dry. Orange-brown to orange-yellow in colour, often exhibiting yellow spots.

Flesh: 

 Soft thick flesh with a lemon-yellow hue, turning blue above the tubes when cut. Pleasant and resinous odour, but a slight sour taste, though still quite pleasant and aromatic.

Gills: 

Bright yellow, darkening with age. Bruising of the pores causes bluish-green discolouration. Subdecurrent attachment to the stipe.

Spores: 

 6.5-9 x 2.8-3.8 Microns in size. Elliptical in shape. Olive spore print.

Stem: 

 Often eccentric and tapered towards the base. Rust-yellow to red-brown. Finely tomentose-punctate 

Did You Know?: 

Additional Notes: 

The species is said to be edible, but should not be picked due to rarity. Information sourced from 'Mushrooms' (Phillips), 'Fungi of Switzerland Vol.III' and Checklist of the British & Irish Basidiomycota Photographs included courtesy of  Mike Valentine.  

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