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TawnyFunnelCap-LepistainversaIvory_PA188110_m
Clitocybe phaeophthalma

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FungiJohn



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Registered: March 2006
Posts: 10,532
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Found at Clumber Park
· Date: Mon April 24, 2006 · Views: 443 · Filesize: 135.2kb · Dimensions: 800 x 578 ·
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Keywords: Clitocybe phaeophthalma
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glsammy

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Registered: October 2005
Location: Nottingham
Posts: 15,586
Tue April 25, 2006 9:22am

Good shot John. Looking at your images, you get the impression Clumber must be full of nothing but Fungi..How come I never see any..

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Graham

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FungiJohn

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Registered: March 2006
Posts: 10,532
Tue April 25, 2006 10:28am


Quote:








Originally Posted by glsammy


Good shot John. Looking at your images, you get the impression Clumber must be full of nothing but Fungi..How come I never see any..



Got to turn your back to the lake Graham



Stroll up clumber lane towards Trumans Lodge and back down the other side to the lake. Even without entering the wood you should find at least a dozen species at this time of year.



On the way back check out the area between the cricket pitch and main car park by a felled Oak tree. This always has at least 6 species all year.



I'll let you know when I'm next at Clumber Graham



John

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mykonik
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Registered: March 2008
Location: Yeovil, Somerset
Posts: 839
Sun April 6, 2008 4:46pm

I think this is Clitocybe phaeophthalma actually - they are too pale whiteish in colour to be Lepista flaccida (= L. inversa). and the discolouration at the edge of the pileus is quite typical in old basidiomes of that species.



Nick
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