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Cardinal Beetle - Pyrochroa coccinea

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FungiJohn



Knight of the Wild Empire

Registered: March 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 10,404
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Found on a foray with Vicky at Clumber Park.
· Date: Sun May 6, 2007 · Views: 1830
· Filesize: 108.7kb · Dimensions: 880 x 677 ·
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Keywords: Cardinal Beetle Pyrochroa coccinea
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poschiavanus

Commander of the Wild Empire

Registered: April 2007
Posts: 1,343
Mon May 7, 2007 2:38pm

I don't think this is P. serraticornis as the head is black. Probably one of the two black-headed cardinal beetles: Black-headed Cardinal beetle P. coccinea or the Scarce Cardinal beetle Schizotus pectinicornis. P. coccinea is larger (over 14 mm) whilst S. pectinicornis is only 8-9 mm, and has a small black spot towards the back of the pronotum. Both are Nationally Scarce.



Here are profiles of all 3 from English Nature report 467

http://www.english-nature.org.uk/pub...DF/enrr467.pdf

Pyrochroidae - Cardinal Beetles

Pyrochroa coccinea (L.) - Black-headed Cardinal. [Nationally Scarce Category B] Larvae develop over two to three years, under bark of freshly dead broad-leaved timber where hunt other insects; cannibalism known; pupates in cell under bark. Mostly in ancient woodlands and wood pastures; widespread in England, extending into the Welsh Border counties, but not penetrating far into SW England, and northwards only into southern Cumbria; identified from about 120-150 10km squares.

Pyrochroa serraticornis (Scopoli)* - Red-headed Cardinal. Larvae develop under bark on various dead broad-leaved trees, in a wide variety of situations in Britain. Rare in Ireland.

Schizotus pectinicornis (L.) - Nationally Scarce A. Larvae under bark of recently dead birch Betula, oak Quercus, Salix and alder Alnus; probably feed on detritus or mould; Scottish Highlands & Welsh Borders.



It therefore seems most likely to be P. coccinea.
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FungiJohn

Knight of the Wild Empire

Registered: March 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 10,404
Mon May 7, 2007 5:13pm

Many thanks for that poschiavanus. Vicky has also just emailed me with the correct name ... coccinea.



John

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Coley

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Registered: August 2007
Location: Hampshire
Posts: 284
Fri July 4, 2008 5:11pm

Lovely shot, it looks sparkly.

I found one of these today, but the wing case was golden yellow. Is that normal?
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